The King's School Grantham

Isaac Newton's School

    Year 11 RE Curriculum

    Students who haven’t opted for the RE GCSE

    Year 11 students have one lesson of RE per two week timetable. This fulfils their statutory entitlement. Year 11 students have a varied RE curriculum following the SACRE guidelines. Part of their RE curriculum is the Young Philosophers Course, understanding and debating classical moral and philosophical problems, which allows them to strengthen their skills of analysis, evaluation and critical thinking in order to improve their attainment in all their other studies.  Given that students have only one lesson per fortnight there are no CAT assessments or reports issued for RE.

    GCSE Full Course RE chosen as an optional subject:  AQA Religious Studies A (8062)

    Key topics to be taught this year: AQA Component 2: Thematic studies.

    What's assessed:

    Two religious, philosophical and ethical studies themes and two textual studies themes.

    Religious, philosophical and ethical studies themes:

    • Theme B: Religion and life.
    • Theme C: The existence of God and revelation.

    Textual studies themes:

    • Theme G: St Mark's Gospel – the life of Jesus.
    • Theme H: St Mark's Gospel as a source of religious, moral and spiritual truths

    3.2.1 Religious, philosophical and ethical studies

    Students should be aware of different religious perspectives on the issues studied within and/or between religious and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism.

    Students must also study religious, philosophical and ethical arguments related to the issues raised, and their impact and influence on the modern world.

    Students will be expected to show their understanding of religion through the application of teachings from religion and beliefs. They will also be expected to make specific references to sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts. They may refer to any relevant religious text such as the Pali Canon, the sermons of the Buddha, the Bible, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the Vedas and Upanishads, the Qur’an and Hadith, the Torah and Talmud, and the Guru Granth Sahib.

    As part of the supporting material for this specification, AQA will publish a list of appropriate texts; alternatives may be used and no questions will be set on them.

    Students must demonstrate knowledge and understanding that: the religious traditions of Great Britain are, in the main, Christian, the religious traditions in Great Britain are diverse.

    Students may draw upon Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism, as well as other religions and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism

    3.2.1.2 Theme B: Religion and life

    Students should study religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, relating to the issues that follow, and their impact and influence in the modern world. They should be aware of contrasting perspectives in contemporary British society on all of these issues.

    They must be able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions: Abortion, Euthanasia and Animal experimentation.

    3.2.1.3 Theme C: The existence of God and revelation

    Students should study religious teachings, and religious and philosophical arguments, relating to the issues that follow, and their impact and influence in the modern world. They should be aware of contrasting perspectives in contemporary British society on all of these issues.

    They must be able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism: Visions, Miracles, and Nature as general revelation.

    3.2.2 Textual studies

    Students entering for textual studies themes must also study Christianity or Catholic Christianity in Component 1.  Students electing for this route must study both textual studies themes (themes G and H).

    In studying these themes, students should be aware of the significance, importance and influence of St Mark’s Gospel for individuals, communities and societies. They should understand how varied interpretations of the meaning of passages from St Mark’s Gospel may give rise to diversity within Christian traditions and consider how far Christian and non-religious communities give authority to St Mark’s Gospel, especially in relation to other sources of contemporary authority. Students should be able to show knowledge of the set texts for study and an understanding of their importance for Jesus, for his early followers and for people of the 21st century. Students should be able to consider the authority of the Gospel and the relevance of Jesus’ example and teaching.

    Autumn Term

    Topic

    Further details about the topic

    Skills

    Religious Studies A (8062) Full course GCSE

    Component 2:  Thematic Studies

    3.2.1.2 Theme B: Religion and Life

    The origins and value of the universe

    The origins of the universe, including:

    • religious teachings about the origins of the universe, and different interpretations of these
    • the relationship between scientific views, such as the Big Bang theory, and religious views.

    The value of the world and the duty of human beings to protect it, including religious teaching about stewardship, dominion, responsibility, awe and wonder.

    The use and abuse of the environment, including the use of natural resources, pollution.

    The use and abuse of animals, including:

    • animal experimentation
    • the use of animals for food

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.
    • AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence

     

     

    3.2.1.2 Theme B: Religion and Life

    The origins and value of human life

    The origins of life, including:

    • religious teachings about the origins of human life, and different interpretations of these
    • the relationship between scientific views, such as evolution, and religious views.
    • The concepts of sanctity of life and the quality of life
    • abortion, including situations when the mother's life is at risk
    • ethical arguments related to abortion, including those based on the sanctity of life and quality of life
    • euthanasia
    • beliefs about death and an afterlife, and their impact on beliefs about the value of human life

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities  and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

    AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence.

    Spring Term

     

     

    Component 2:  Thematic Studies

    3.2.1.3 Theme C: The existence of God and revelation. Philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God.

    The Design argument, including its strengths and weaknesses.

    The First Cause argument, including its strengths and weaknesses.

    The argument from miracles, including its strengths and weaknesses, and one example of a miracle.

    Evil and suffering as an argument against the existence of God.

    Arguments based on science against the existence of God.

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

    AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence

     

     

    3.2.1.3 Theme C: The existence of God and revelation.  The nature of the divine and revelation.

    Special revelation as a source of knowledge about the divine (God, gods or ultimate reality) including visions and one example of a vision.

    Enlightenment as a source of knowledge about the divine.

    General revelation: nature and scripture as a way of understanding the divine.

    Different ideas about the divine that come from these sources:

    • omnipotent and omniscient
    • personal and impersonal
    • immanent and transcendent.

    The value of general and special revelation and enlightenment as sources of knowledge about the divine, including:

    • the problems of different ideas about the divine arising from these experiences
    • alternative explanations for the experiences, and the possibility that the people who claimed to have them were lying or mistaken.

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

    AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence

     

     

    3.2.2.1 Theme G: St Mark’s gospel: the life of Jesus.  The early ministry of Jesus.

    John’s preparation for Jesus’ ministry: 1:1–8.

    Jesus’ baptism and temptation: 1:9–13.

    The paralysed man: 2:1–12.

    Jairus’ daughter: 5:21–24a, 35–43.

    The rejection at Nazareth: 6:1–6.

    The feeding of the five thousand: 6:30–44

    The later ministry of Jesus

    The conversation at Caesarea Philippi: 8:27–33.

    The transfiguration of Jesus: 9:2–9.

    Jesus’ passion prediction: 10:32–34.

    The request of James and John: 10:35–45.

    Bartimaeus: 10:46–52.

    The entry into Jerusalem: 11:1–11.

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

    AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence

    Summer Term

     

    3.2.2.1 Theme G: St Mark’s gospel: the life of Jesus.

    Significance

    The titles Son of Man, Son of God, Christ (Messiah) and Son of David, including their meaning for 1st century Jews and Jesus.

    The significance for 21st century Christians of Jesus’ understanding of the titles Son of Man, Son of God, Christ (Messiah) and Son of David.

    St Mark’s portrayal of Jesus as a teacher and miracle worker, including contrasting views on the historicity of the miracle stories.

    Differing beliefs about the meaning of Jesus’ words and actions at the Last Supper.

    Differing beliefs about the significance of Jesus' death and resurrection, and different explanations given for the empty tomb.

    Differing views on the authority of St Mark ’s Gospel relating to the life of Jesus in relation to the challenges posed by secular sources of contemporary authority.

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

    AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence

     

     

    3.2.2.2 Theme H: St Mark’s Gospel as a source of religious, moral and spiritual truths

    The Kingdom of God

    Parable of the sower: 4:1–9, 14–20.

    Parable of the growing seed: 4:26–29.

    Parable of the mustard seed: 4:30–32.

    Jesus and the children: 10:13–16.

    The rich man: 10:17–27.

    The greatest commandment: 12:28–34.

    Jesus’ relationships with those disregarded by society

    The man with leprosy: 1:40–45.

    The call of Levi: 2:13–17.

    The Greek (Syro-Phoenician) woman’s daughter: 7:24–30.

    The epileptic (demon-possessed) boy: 9:14–29.

    The widow at the treasury: 12:41–44.

    The anointing at Bethany: 14:1–9.

    Faith and discipleship

    The call of the first disciples: 1:16–20.

    The woman with a haemorrhage: 5:24b–34.

    The mission of the Twelve: 6:7–13.

    The cost and rewards of discipleship: 8:34–38; 10:28–31.

    Peter’s denials: 14:27–31, 66–72.

    The commission and ascension: 16:14–20

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

    AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence

     

     

    3.2.2.2 Theme H: St Mark’s Gospel as a source of religious, moral and spiritual truths

    Significance

    The significance and importance for Jesus, for the people of his day and for people in the 21st century, of key events in the life of Jesus recorded St Mark.

    Different ways in which the Kingdom of God might be understood, including as a present reality and a future hope, and as a personal inner state and a community.

    Reasons for 1st century attitudes and those of Jesus to those disregarded by society.

    The significance and importance for Christians of Jesus’ attitudes to those disregarded by the society of his day.

    Different views on the significance and importance for Jesus’ disciples and for 21st century Christians of discipleship as seen in incidents relating to Jesus’ disciples and in Jesus’ teaching.

    Different views on the nature and importance of faith as seen in St Mark’s Gospel.

    Differing views on the authority of Jesus’ teaching as recorded by St Mark in relation to the challenges posed by secular sources of contemporary authority.

    Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all GCSE Religious Studies A specifications and all exam boards.

    The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

    AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including:

    • beliefs, practices and sources of authority
    • influence on individuals, communities and societies
    • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs.

    AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence

     Assessments:

     

    Topic

    Type of Assessment

    CAT 1

    Component 2: Thematic studies

    Past paper for each topic - Religious Studies A (8062) – Full course GCSE

    CAT 2

    Component 2: Thematic studies

    Past paper for each topic - Religious Studies A (8062) – Full course GCSE

    CAT 3

    Component 2: Thematic studies

    Past paper for each topic - Religious Studies A (8062)Full course GCSE

     Main Resources:

    Resource

    Details

    Term

    Text books

     

     

     

     

     

    AQA GCSE Religious Studies A: Mark’s Gospel

    Authors: Francis Loftus
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    ISBN-13: 978-0-19-837039-0

    AQA GCSE Religious Studies A: Christianity

    Authors: Cynthia Bartlett (series editor), Marianne Fleming, Peter Smith, David Worden
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    ISBN-13: 978-0-19-837033-8

    All

    Recommended reading

    Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Ecclesiastes, Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of John, Psalms.

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by  Douglas Adams

    Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

    Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella

    Behold The Man (S.F. Masterworks) by Michael Moorcock

    All

    Recommended websites

    RE:Quest - Christianity in R.E.

    http://www.request.org.uk/

    BBC Religion and Ethics

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/0/

    RE:Online

    http://www.reonline.org.uk/

    All