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A level English Language and Literature Years 12 & 13

Specification

EDUQAS - The specification and assessment structure can be found at the link:

https://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce/english-language-and-literature-emc-h074-h474-from-2015/

Split into three examination units and one independent study (coursework) unit.

The course details appear below:

Content Overview Assessment Overview Total of A Level
Component 1 focuses on an OCR anthology of 20 non-fiction spoken and written texts across different time periods and contexts.
Comparative and contextual study based on the anthology and unseen texts.
Exploring non-fiction and spoken texts.
32 marks
Written paper: 1 hour
16% of total A Level
Component 2 focuses on one poetry collection from a choice of six and one drama text from a choice of six.
Exploration of the text through stylistic and dramatic analysis.
The language of poetry and plays
63 marks
Written paper:  2 hours
32% of total A Level
Component 3 focuses on exploring the nature of narrative in one prose fiction text from a choice of six.
Writing as a reader develops the understanding of narrative technique through a creative writing task (500 words) and a commentary (250 words)
Reading as a writer, writing as a reader
64 marks
Written paper:  2 hours
32% of total A Level
Independent study allowing learners to pursue particular interests and develop their expertise through an analytical comparative essay on a set text from a list of 12 non-fiction texts and a second free choice text.  One text must be post-2000.
Learners also produce a piece of original non-fiction writing.
Independent study: analyzing and producing texts
Non examined assessment
40 marks
20% of total A Level

Course Texts per unit

Component 1:

Students study an anthology of non-fiction texts from different genres and time periods. Ranging from obituaries, sports commentaries, speeches to a diary in the form of a graphic novel.

In the exam they must compare an unseen non-fiction text with one of the texts studied in class.

Component 2

Songs of Innocence and Experience by William Blake

An early rebel and outspoken radical, Blake hides fierce criticism of society behind seemingly simple childlike poems. Students study a selection of these poems in class and then compare one given poem on the exam paper with two or three of their choice.

Othello by William Shakespeare

Full of exciting themes such as revenge, jealousy, duplicity, race and gender, Othello contains possibly the greatest villain in any work of literature in the character of Iago. The play is studied in terms of its dramatic and stylistic features. In the exam, students receive an extract from the play and must analyse the dramatic, stylistic and contextual features of the extract.

Component 3: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

The novel deals with Nigerian tribal society pre-colonialism and the clash that occurs when the English missionaries try to change this traditional world.

The text is studied in class and the exam question asks the candidates to focus on a generic area of a novel such as characterisation or narration. Open book exam.

Then students are given a brief outline for a creative piece of writing and must produce 500 words in the exam room. They must then write a commentary on their creative piece justifying their language choices and chosen structure.

Independent Study

A chance for you to choose which texts you wish to write about! Your own choice of text from any genre must be compared to one of a list of 12 set texts in the non-fiction genre. You choose the focus and the title. 1500-2000 words

An opportunity for you to write about an area or issue which interests you! Create a non-fiction text in a recognised genre of 1000-1200 words.

What will English Language and Literature lead to?

Virtually whatever you want! A solid/good result in English Language and Literature confirms your grasp of a wide range of transferable skills - your ability to communicate effectively, to construct logical and well substantiated arguments, to be objective, to use language in order to create specific effects and to respond appropriately to the written word. All these skills are valuable in themselves, but are also much prized by universities and employers.

The 'A' Level provides a firm foundation for the study of arts, humanities and social sciences at college or university (e.g. law, languages, history, philosophy, psychology, journalism, media studies).

Year 12

  Topic Further details about the topic Skills
Autumn Term
1

Linguistic frameworks
Introduction to non-fiction writing.
The novel “Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe.

A robust grounding in grammatical and linguistic terminology.

An introduction to writing for different audience and purposes.

Background study of the context of the novel

Analytical skills in order to approach the extracts in the OCR anthology.

Writing skills needed for the non-fiction element of the exam.

Identifying features which contribute to the generic and literary concepts of the novel.

2

OCR anthology

The novel “Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe.

Analysis of spoken language; transcripts; speeches; letters; biographies; articles from different time periods.

Show knowledge and understanding of how language choices shape meanings in texts.

Application of linguistic terminology.

Identify aspects of narrative such as:

  • the use of voice
  • point of view
  • time and chronology
  • dialogue
  • characterisation
  • genre
  • symbols and motifs
  • structure and settings.
Spring Term
1

Analysis of the OCR anthology in preparation for the exam.

The novel “Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe.

Stylistic background to poetry analysis.

Each OCR anthology text will be studied in detail and annotated fully.

Show knowledge and understanding of how language choices shape meanings in texts.

Analysing a poem through linguistic techniques.

Analytical skills using concepts and ideas from linguistic study.

identify aspects of narrative such as:

  • the use of voice
  • point of view
  • time and chronology
  • dialogue
  • characterisation
  • genre
  • symbols and motifs
  • structure and settings.
2

Developing non-fiction writing skills.

William Blake: Songs of Innocence and Experience 15 poems.

Understanding the different non-fiction forms.

Analyse poetic and

stylistic techniques.

Ongoing writing on demand practice.

Identify aspects of the poem

foregrounded through the use of repetition, pattern-making, patter-breaking

and deviation to develop an

interpretation of the set poems.

Summer Term
1 Exam preparation

Practice questions will be sat in timed conditions.

Exam technique.

2

Creative Writing in preparation for the A2 exam.

Introduction to the non-examined component.

Study of narrative writing.

Introduce the two pieces of coursework for the non-examined component:

1. Non-fiction writing:

  • Experimenting with different writing forms
  • Analysing style models

2. Introduction to the demands of the comparative essay and independent wider reading:

  • Read and analyse the open pages from the set text list
  • -discuss comparison techniques
  • -explore ‘free choice’ texts

Key descriptive writing skills.

Adapting writing style to suit different audience and purposes.

Independent wider reading.

Year 13

  Topic Further details about the topic Skills
Autumn Term
1

Comparative text study for coursework.

Study of narrative structure for writing as a reader exam.

Continued drafting of agreed title for coursework.

Experimenting with narrative text organisation and style. Analysing own style for commentary writing.

Genre conventions of a variety of texts types.

Highly specialised and complex writing skills.

Analytical commentary writing and associated terminology.

2

Coursework will begin and be completed.

A Streetcar Named Desire - Tennessee Williams

Continued drafting of agreed title for coursework.

Understanding of the ways in which the playwright presents a theme, idea, character or other aspect of the drama.

Highly specialised and complex writing skills.

Analytical skills when analysing Shakespearean drama.

Spring Term
1

A Streetcar Named Desire - Tennessee Williams

Paper 1 Anthology of texts

The play will be studied in close detail as this is a closed book exam.

Preparation for paper 1. Analyse a range of unseen texts.

Analytical skills when analysing Shakespearean drama.

Compare and contrast the anthology texts with a range of unseen non-fiction examples.

2

Things Fall Apart – Chinua Achebe

Continue to revise the anthology texts

Songs of Innocence and Experience – William Blake

Learners will be required to answer one generic question, from a choice of two, on an aspect of narrative (such as narrative voice, the handling of time, moments of crisis).

Learners answer one question on a poem from the collection and compare it with their choice of one or two other poems from their collection.

Re-reading the text focussing on narrative techniques.

Re-reading the texts focussing on linguistic techniques.

Re-visiting the poems, analysing pattern making and breaking.

Summer Term
1

Practice papers: A Streetcar Named Desire - Tennessee Williams

Things Fall Apart, Blake and narrative writing.

Practice papers: Paper 1 the anthology, unseen text comparison

Exam technique will be refined

 

Exam technique will be refined

Assessments

Resources Topic Type of assessment
CAT 1

Baseline test on linguistic terminology

Analysing an extract from “Things Fall Apart”

Written test
CAT 2

A piece of original non-fiction

Analysing an extract from “Things Fall Apart”

Written test
CAT 3

Practice exam question comparing two texts from the OCR anthology

A comparative essay on two Blake poems.

End of year Mock Examination

CAT 4

Practice writing as reader task and commentary

Coursework drafts for both the comparative essay and original non-fiction writing

Written test

Written drafts

CAT 5

Othello factual revision test on the areas of the play covered to date.

Coursework drafts for both the comparative essay and original non-fiction writing

Written test

Written drafts

CAT 6

A Streetcar Named Desire - Tennessee Williams exam task

Writing as a reader.

Paper 1 exam – anthology and unseen text

Mock Examination 

Main Resources

Resource Details Term
Set texts

OCR anthology (provided)
“Things Fall Apart”- Chinua Achebe
William Blake  “Songs of Innocence and Experience”

Copy of A Streetcar Named Desire - Tennessee Williams Penguins Classics edition

All

Recommended reading

Chinua Achebe “No Longer at Ease”, “Arrow of God”

All
Recommended Websites

 

All
Equipment Ring binder folder, file dividers, pen and highlighters All

Enrichment opportunities

Activity Day and time or term
Coursework ‘Catch up’ and improvement time Lunchtimes at the discretion of the teacher

Where Next